Tel: 07 3868 1244 | Fax: 07 3868 3206 | Postal Address: PO Box 48 Banyo Qld 4014

Cultural Heritage Training


Jagera Daran offers a selection of cultural heritage training listed below. Please read the individual sections relating to the specific training you are interested in.

  • Certificate 3 in Indigenous Cultural Heritage Assessment (archaeological foundations)
  • Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act Training
  • Cultural Heritage Site Inductions
  • Cultural Awareness Training

Cultural Heritage Assessment Training

As a cultural heritage consultancy, we have worked closely with numerous private developers in major infrastructure projects and are sensitive to the many legislative obligations required of the mining and resource sector.

We have worked for more than seven years on identifying and developing effective cultural heritage services that recognise private industry’s need to engage local aboriginal communities as part of their duty of care and the pressures this can place on achieving project milestones.

Through our long-term involvement in cultural heritage services on a diverse range of development projects in Queensland, we have subsequently identified the need for the development of an Indigenous Cultural Heritage Assessment Course.

What does the certificate 3 Indigenous Cultural Heritage Assessment Course provide?

For Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Communities:

  • Develop individual and organisational capacity to deliver cultural heritage services;
  • Ensure cultural heritage services meet ‘best practise’ standards;
  • Gateway to other career pathways and employment opportunities;
  • Assist Indigenous Cultural Heritage Bodies in developing transparent and consistent rates for service delivery;
  • Transfer knowledge and industry relevant skill sets to empower individuals and community organisations to participate confidentially with government.

Some of the specific modules to be delivered and skills to be taught are as follows:

  • legislation recognition
  • Indigenous cultural protocols and processes
  • cultural sites and objects identification
  • site inspection
  • vegetation identification
  • predictive landscape archaeology
  • test excavation
  • site mitigation
  • applying knowledge of WHS in the workplace
  • reporting and communications in cultural heritage assessment
  • risk management in cultural heritage assessment
  • use of technology in cultural heritage assessment
  • curation

For Government:

  • Certainty of process when engaging aboriginal communities in cultural heritage assessment on projects;
  • Linking legislative obligations with duty of care to actual implementation for state-wide and regional operational activities;
  • Aides in pre-determining budget requirements surrounding cultural heritage costs within a project;
  • Clarity and transparency around cultural heritage assessment, management and reporting stages of cultural heritage;
  • Greater management of cultural heritage process and engagement of specialists to meet project objectives and timeframes;
  • Reduce wasteful expenditure on multiple consultancy layers that do not meet diverse departmental and project objectives; and
  • Achieve policy objectives in redirecting expenditure to front line services, through meaningful engagement of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander communities in cultural heritage.

For Industry:

  • Certainty of process when engaging aboriginal communities in cultural heritage assessment on projects and strengthening relationships with traditional owner communities
  • Linking legislative obligations with duty of care to actual implementation for state-wide and regional operational activities;
  • Aides in pre-determining budget requirements surrounding cultural heritage costs within a project;
  • Clarity and transparency around cultural heritage assessment, management and reporting stages of cultural heritage;
  • Greater management of cultural heritage process and engagement of specialists to meet project objectives and timeframes; For Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Communities:
  • Ensure cultural heritage services meet ‘best practise’ standards;
  • Gateway to other career pathways and employment opportunities;
  • Transfer knowledge and industry relevant skill sets to empower individuals and community organisations to participate confidentially with private industry.

What distinguishes it from other courses?

Being specialists, who have had more than 10 years of applied practice in Indigenous cultural heritage delivery within Queensland, we have had the opportunity to review all aspects of cultural heritage delivery and have successfully identified what are the exact training needs required.

Through application and constant adaption of the services, in consultation with both Indigenous people, Government and Industry, we have identified a course that is suitable to Community, Government and Industry needs.

We have researched and studied what is available both within Queensland and Nationally, comparing course modules and content. We are satisfied that the course we are developing is unique and adaptable in all legislative environments, as it has a robust process founded in ‘best practise’.

Distinguishing Characteristics are:

  • Robust and transparent process for Staged Cultural Heritage Assessment;
  • Inclusion of scientific tools and methods;
  • Hybridised blend of Western archaeological practises and traditional Indigenous knowledge;
  • 80% in-field training and greater weight placed on recognition of prior learning;
  • Thought-fully created to enable application in all environments;
  • Designed to meet national standards of ‘best practise’;
  • Specifically designed support documentation and in-field hand guides; and
  • Designed by Aboriginal People for Indigenous people in the field of Indigenous Australian Cultural Heritage.

 

Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act Training

Jagera Daran specialises in delivering Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act training informing individuals as well as private and government entities what their duty of care and responsibilities are surrounding the 2003 Aboriginal Cultural Heritage Act. Training can be tailored to suit the unique needs of the organisation and its respective members and is delivered with the understanding of what consideration the organisation will need, depending on their core business and how the Act will impact upon their activities.

Cultural Heritage Site Inductions

Cultural heritage site inductions are used to inform on-ground construction crew and sub-contractors to ensure that there is consistency in the delivery of principals, objectives, procedures and processes agreed to in a cultural heritage management plan or cultural heritage management agreement.

Often there is a significant discourse between the objectives of a cultural heritage management plan or cultural heritage agreement and the responsibility of the Principal contractor and sub-contractors, when it comes to the application of the cultural heritage management plan or cultural heritage management agreement.

Cultural heritage site inductions assist both the Sponsor and the Aboriginal Party in communicating the responsibilities of the employees of contractors and sub-contractors in the successful and efficient implementation of cultural heritage management plans and cultural heritage management agreements, so as to avoid disputes or potential breaches of contract.

Cultural heritage site inductions are an important tool for continuing Aboriginal Party involvement in various aspects of project delivery and as a supplementary recommendation to be included in a cultural heritage management plan or cultural heritage management agreement that could be used to develop relationships and strengthen the joint responsibility of all Parties in protecting aboriginal cultural heritage.

Cultural heritage site inductions are usually presented in either, all or a combination of the following:

1. a specific site induction presentation;

2. a smaller and succinct tool box presentation; or

3. a dvd recorded induction, containing images and flowcharts.

A specific cultural heritage site induction is usually a presentation of about 30-45 minutes in duration. This type of site induction summarises information obtained in a comprehensive cultural heritage assessment report.

The presentation may include information about the aboriginal cultural heritage and people specific to the area in which a project is located, what cultural heritage is from a Traditional Owner perspective, the nature of the cultural heritage located and examples of cultural heritage places, sites and objects, no-go zones, monitoring areas, the role and presence of the Aboriginal Party on the project, stop work directions, New Finds procedures and the requirements of an existing cultural heritage management plans or cultural heritage management agreements for a project.

A smaller and succinct tool-box presentation is usually about 15-30 minutes in duration.  This form of site induction is designed to accommodate pre-start workshops or meetings. It is designed to target specific information necessary for the operation of the projects work plan, such as the location of “no-go” or “out of bounds” areas, identified monitoring areas, Aboriginal party representatives on site and, images of the type of cultural heritage that may be present within the project area.

Dvd recorded inductions are usually developed by Sponsors, in conjunction with the Aboriginal Party/Parties for the purposes of presenting to a diverse range of employees, agents and contractors.

A dvd recorded induction is usually a presentation of 30-60 minutes in duration.

A dvd recorded induction takes longer to develop and the content contains the information that is more generic and is aimed at educating the intended audience about aboriginal cultural heritage, protocols for engagement, procedures for new finds and the diverse nature of aboriginal cultural heritage that may be located.

This form of induction is presented to the Sponsor’s key personnel, principal contractor’s site supervisors and sub-contractors engaged across an organisation’s operational activities and is usually not designed to contain site specific detail.

All cultural heritage site inductions should be developed and delivered by local Aboriginal Parties to the Principal Contractor’s employees and on-ground construction crew.  Dvd recorded inductions should be developed in agreement and partnership with Indigenous people.

Cultural heritage site inductions are usually delivered at the same time as environmental or workplace safety site inductions.  Cultural heritage site inductions should be seen as complimentary to the environmental and workplace safety site inductions. However this is not always possible, so agreed scheduled inductions should be organised.

It is important to note that the majority of cultural heritage site inductions are delivered on a “construction site” and members of the Aboriginal Party tasked with delivering the inductions should be inducted into the site and possess white cards.  Where nominated members of the Aboriginal Party tasked with delivering the inductions do not possess white cards, the Sponsor should assist the Aboriginal Party with obtaining a white card to enable delivery of the inductions.

 

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